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Championship Productions Featured Items!

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    with Herb Magee, Philadelphia University Head Coach;
    distinguished member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (2011);
    1,000 career wins (most wins in NCAA Division II men's basketball history);
    2x national coach of the year; College Division National Champions (1970);
    known as the Shot Doctor across America, Coach Magee has worked with several current NBA players to help better their shooting performance

    Herb Magee, one of the most successful coaches of all time, is known for more than winning. Having instructed and improved thousands of players' shots over his 40-plus years in coaching - including NBA players - Coach Magee has earned the name "Shot Doctor."

    In this presentation, Coach Magee breaks down the art of shooting into four points of emphasis to teach and become a great shooter.

    You will learn the key elements of the shot, how to teach them to your players and how to make them better shooters.

    Coach Magee begins with an introduction of shooting mechanics, shows how to identify errors in technique and how to teach a proper shot. It's important for both the coach and player to understand "why" a shot missed so that corrections can be made.

    In this presentation, the shot is broken down into four elements:

    • Shooting Hand - Learn proper hand placement and span for great control of the ball. Discover effective methods for self-evaluation, the four noises in shooting, three key points about the position of the ball and holding your release.
    • Guide Hand - An often neglected component of the shot is the guide hand. A bad shooter most likely is not using the guide hand properly. You will learn the critical elements of hand placement, the point of release and how to "fix" a player's misuse of the guide hand.
    • Legs - Footwork is just as important as the shot itself. While Coach Magee acknowledges differing philosophies of shooting footwork, he explains his proven technique and why it's the most effective.
    • Target - No matter how good the shooting form and technique, if a player doesn't aim for the right spot the ball will not "swish" through the net. Coach Magee's technique is simple to teach, simple to assess and provides simple fixes after a missed shot.

    Once you've developed great shooters, it's time to give them opportunities to succeed. With over 1,000 wins, Coach Magee knows how to get his players open shots. He closes out the session with a couple of plays designed to get shooters open - including a play the Golden State Warriors use to get Steph Curry a great look at the basket.

    Coach Magee will tell you he's in the Basketball Hall of Fame not because his teams relied on a "system" to win over 1000 games - it's because his teams could shoot better than their opponents. Making shots leads to wins. In this shooting clinic, you will see why NBA players and teams that need shooting guidance have called on Coach Magee for more than 30 years.

    Produced at the Fall 2014 Philadelphia (PA) clinic.

    76 minutes. 2015.


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    with Mark Few,
    Gonzaga University Head Coach; 11x WCC Coach of the Year;
    12 WCC Tournament Championships and 14 WCC regular season titles;
    has advanced to the NCAA tournament in each of his 16 years as head coach at Gonzaga (1999-2015)

    Efficient is the word to describe Mark Few's practices. Every minute of every drill is used to improve his players' skills and understanding of the game. Coach Few opens the doors to the first three practices of the 2014-15 season, which resulted in his 11th West Coast Conference crown and an Elite Eight appearance in the 2015 NCAA Tournament.

    Practice 1
    In Gonzaga's first practice of the 2014-2015 season, you will see live, unedited practice footage of the Bulldogs working on defense, transition, and half-court offensive execution. Using breakdown drills, Coach Few introduces the principles and fundamentals of man-to-man defense. In the "3 v 3 Circle Drill," players work on close outs, defensive positioning, and "bluff and recover" to help on dribble penetration.

    On the offensive side, a mix of breakdown drills to improve passing and shooting are taught. In the "In/Out Shooting" and "Angle Passing" drills, you'll learn how to teach common actions. The Bulldogs also begin to develop their offensive system using 10 set plays.

    Throughout the practice, you'll see how Coach Few breaks down the whole to ensure players learn how to do the little things - which leads to getting the big things accomplished. Coach Few and his staff are constantly communicating and teaching. Every mistake is addressed and every success is acknowledged.

    Practice 2
    Coach Few continues establishing the foundation of his defensive system. Many of the drills emphasize raising the intensity of the on-ball pressure. In the "Z Drill" and "Snake Pit," defenders focus on keeping the ball in front of them. The "Pressure Trap Drill" teaches players to aggressively play for deflections. In another major defensive segment, the team focuses on coordinating with one another to defend ball screens with hard shows, soft shows, traps, switches, and X-outs.

    The team breaks down by position for individual skill work. The post players work on high/low entries and finishing in the post while the guards drill driving, spacing, and relocating. Both guards and bigs simulate the shots that they will get in Gonzaga's half-court offense. The practice session concludes with a 5-on-5 half-court scrimmage. Coach Few goes into the detail teaching the Bulldogs' set versus man-to-man defense. He stresses making the proper reads and knowing the fundamentals of each play.

    Practice 3
    The building blocks of offensive and defensive strategies continue to be emphasized in the third practice. To read ball screens effectively, new drills are introduced to teach players how to quickly dismantle defensive reactions. After working on fundamentals, the Bulldogs work on defending off-ball screens and helping on drives.

    Coach Few introduces "icing" the pick-and-roll in this practice. Icing is a ball screen defense in the NBA that forces the ball handler, in a side pick and roll, towards the baseline and away from the middle. Gonzaga's Blue coverage is also introduced. Blue is a big-on-big double on the post when the offense has three on the perimeter and two inside. Coach Few goes over how to trap and rotate. In 4-on-4 shell drill, the Bulldogs use a scoring system that rewards defense in various ways.

    On offense, breakdown drills are used to teach players how to make reads out of side ball screen situations. Full-court drills such as "Laker Break" and "Rebound to Break" are used to show players how to score in transition off a fast break or to flow into their half-court offense while keeping the defense on their heels.

    In the guard/forward skill segment, each position learns how to battle for rebounds. Practice ends with a 5-on-5 scrimmage where defensive efforts win the game.

    As you watch this presentation, it becomes clear why the Gonzaga program has been so successful over the past 15 years. As a coach, you'll have the opportunity to learn different drills and sets that you can implement into your program. Understanding and then teaching these principles will help teams regardless of age and skill level to play smarter and more effectively.

    378 minutes (3 DVDs). 2015.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's gym can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


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    with Kevin Boyle,
    Montverde Academy (FL) Head Coach;
    2015 High School National Champions; back-to-back-to-back High School National Champions (2013-15);
    has led Montverde to a 107-7 record in four season (2012-15);
    2011 Naismith National High School Boys Basketball Coach of the Year; 2x USA Today National HS Coach of the Year; the only High School Coach to have back-to-back NBA Draft picks (picked #1 and #2) with the 2011 #1 pick Kyrie Irving and the 2012 # 2 pick Michael Kidd-Gilchrist.

    Kevin Boyle is one of the country's premier high school basketball coaches and his teams are widely known for their in-your-face pressure defense.

    This on-court presentation is jam-packed with high intensity drills that will turn your defense into a competitive advantage for your team. The drills are progressive and will improve both individual and team defensive skills. Each drill in this step-by-step model is physically demanding, easy to implement, game speed and provides built-in conditioning.

    Warm Up
    The presentation starts with seven warm-up drills that have offensive and defensive elements to challenge the skills of both. The drills include passing, cutting and shooting action. The flip pass action is described in even more detail than some of the other drills and can be extremely valuable to any coach. Because Coach Boyle uses warm-up drills that simulate their offense, players get two benefits from these drills and the coach gets more time in practice to work on other important concepts.

    Half Court Defense
    Throughout the presentation, Boyle shows how each drill is run and corrects the players when they make common mistakes. Drills include:

    • Tracing the Ball - Effective ball pressure must be quick and smart. Although this is a simple drill, it is essential for creating the kind of ball pressure that will help every other aspect of your defense.
    • Denying the Passing Lane - The best way to stop an offense in its tracks is to take away passing options. Coach Boyle teaches proper spacing, angles and movement to deny passing lanes.
    • Guarding a Cutter - When you aggressively deny passes, a good offense will resort to face cuts and backdoor cuts. After learning to deny a perimeter pass, this drill teaches defenders to stop and redirect cutters.
    • Help and Recover - When a teammate gets beat off the dribble, the help defender must learn to step in without giving up an easy shot from his own man. Quick reaction, timing, and a quick closeout are key elements in this drill.
    • Closeout Drill Series - With more and more players shooting and driving, closeouts have become a key element of a successful defense. This collection of short drills will quickly improve this skill set.
    • Slide Drill Series - Staying in front and slowing down the ball handler is of utmost importance. Coach Boyle improves the age-old zigzag drill by making it more realistic. Your players will improve their defensive slide, learn to cut off angles and transition quicker from slide to sprint in a full court setting.
    • Defending Drives from the Wing Series - In this collection of four drills, players first learn to cut off wing penetration and then they learn how to defend a spin move that results from the cut-off.
    • Guarding Duck-ins and Post-ups - Duck-ins put the offensive player right into the heart of your defense. In this drill, players learn how to keep the post player out of the paint and how to deny passes to the post. Your players will improve their toughness and their footwork.

    Full Court Defense
    While defending in the half court is essential to a team's success, picking up in the full court can also present some major issues for teams. Coach Boyle teaches a full-court pressure defense that stresses some of the same concepts he covers in the half court. He shows you what to do after you get split when trapping in full court. He then shows how players must get below the ball in order to be in a great help defensive position. Coach Boyle shares five great trapping drills to train players on how to keep chasing the ball and how to continue hounding the ball handler full court.

    Quick Hitters
    Coach Boyle ends the session with a couple of his favorite quick hitter plays that can assist your team with scoring easy baskets and get the ball to your best player in good scoring position.

    This inside look into Coach Boyle's system is a tremendous way for any coach to help his or her team improve on the defensive end of the court. If you want to build a championship-caliber defense, these drills are sure to help.

    Produced at the 2014 Philadelphia (PA) clinic.

    70 minutes. 2015.


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    with Dan Majerle,
    Grand Canyon University Head Coach; former Phoenix Suns Assistant Coach;
    14-year NBA veteran, 3x NBA All Star, 2x NBA All-Defensive Second Team, member of Dream Team 2

    For the majority of Dan Majerle's 14 year NBA career, he played on teams whose success was based on high-octane, fast-paced offense. Majerle, a three-time NBA All-Star, takes what he's learned from some of the best NBA coaches and demonstrates a pro style transition and secondary break offense that can be run off of makes or misses.

    You'll learn how to execute quick options for every position and in multiple scenarios, which will wear teams out and allow you to exploit specific match-ups. This offense is easy to implement and will produce excellent opportunities for any team.

    Transition Off a Miss
    Coach Majerle starts with how the 2 and 3 run the floor and how they position themselves on the offensive end. You will see how bigs run the floor, the options they have on pitch aheads and their positioning.

    Once the team is down the floor Majerle shows three easy-to-run secondary breaks. These sets deliver back doors, dribble hand offs, screens and double screens, and help with handling defensive switching.

    Transition Off a Make
    Learn how these same transition concepts off a made basket. Four secondary break plays are demonstrated using the 2-player game, drag and double drag, and pinch the post. Majerle also shows you how to empty out a side of the floor to create space for your best players to operate.

    Shooting
    A big part of Dan Majerle's NBA career hinged on his outside shooting ability. In this segment, Coach Majerle shares essential fundamentals for becoming a successful shooter. Majerle focuses on footwork, shooting in game-like situations and how to catch and release the ball on the seams.

    The transition offense plays and secondary options on this video will elevate your team's scoring opportunities. This fast-paced style of play is not only fun to watch, but your players will enjoy running the court end-to-end.

    Produced at the Fall 2014 Phoenix (AZ) clinic.

    62 minutes. 2015.


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    with Mike Anderson,
    University of Arkansas Head Coach;
    2009 NABC Coach of the Year;
    in 13 years as a head coach he has never had a losing season (2003-15)

    Mike Anderson is no stranger to playing up-tempo, fast paced basketball. As a part of the Arkansas basketball program in the early 90's, he assisted legendary coach Nolan Richardson during a National Title run utilizing speed, pressure defense and playing 40 minutes of hard nose basketball. Now, as head coach of the University of Arkansas, he practices some of those same principles as he guides his teams.

    This All Access DVD gives you a look at how Coach Anderson puts together practices that push his players to play 40 minutes of fast-paced basketball every time they take the floor.

    These live practices take place two weeks into the start of the season and with a little over two weeks remaining before the team's first game. Anderson emphasizes reducing turnovers, getting out on the fast break, and individual defensive intensity. The majority of the team's skill development and drill work is done in the full court with a special emphasis on pressure defense and getting up and down the floor quickly.

    These practices are filled with ideas and drills for developing fast break offense and full court pressure defense.

    Practice 1
    Practice one of this three practice package delivers a heavy emphasis on skill development. You will see time-saving practice drills that simultaneously work on passing, footwork, ball handling, and shooting.

    In the Two-Ball Shooting Drill, players improve shooting accuracy while shooting off the dribble and while taking spot-up shots. During guard/post breakdowns, the perimeter players work on attacking the rim and playing through contact while the bigs practice footwork and post moves.

    You will see defensive breakdown drills like the "1-on-1 Drill" that works on denying passes to the wing and forcing the ball baseline. You'll also see 2-on-2 drills for developing defensive awareness, while stressing wing and post denial.

    The Arkansas coaching staff reviews offensive sets vs. man defense. The squad runs plays 5-on-0 and practices running each option of the play while developing spacing and timing.

    Coach Anderson's team also reviews some of their secondary break options while running dry in a full-court up-and-down scenario. Practice closes with live 5-on-5 action with Anderson focusing heavily on the team's half-court, attacking, trapping, zone defensive system.

    Practice 2
    In this practice, the intensity of the workout is ramped up with a bulk of the session devoted to 5-on-5 competitive scrimmages. Players are pushed to use their skills and fundamentals at game speed.

    The warm-up consists of a variety of defensive and offensive drills like the 1-on-1 Zig Zag, which has players guard the ball the full length of the court, and the Medicine Ball Weave that develops strength as they run the floor.

    The skill development segment has the posts working on multiple skills such as curl shooting, rebounding, finishing, v-cut attack moves and 3-on-3 in the half court. Guards work on shooting back screens and pin down screens. Coach Anderson also incorporates some 2-on-2 and 3-on-3 controlled scrimmage drills into the segment.

    In the 5-on-5 scrimmages, players work on multiple aspects of the Arkansas up-tempo philosophy including their fast break offense, half court man-to-man defense, 41 full court press, and match-up zone defense.

    Practice 3
    Practice three begins with post players working on skip passing, re-posting, screening, wing catch attacks and passing. Guards work on catch and shoot, one dribble pull ups and dribble hand offs.

    You will see a breakdown of defensive skills beginning with proper trapping then moving to post defense and 2-on-2 rebound outlet. The 5-on-4 drill has players scrambling and communicating as a team to get a defensive stop in a disadvantage situation.

    Coach Anderson gives an extended look into how they run their 2-2-1 press, which ends in a half-court trapping 2-3 zone in "Full Court 5-on- 5." From there you see their pressure man defense.

    Special situations like running off free throws is also covered giving you a comprehensive look into the full-court pressure system.

    Practice ends with "Shooting Game," a competitive partner drill that works on conditioning and hitting different types of game shots from game spots.

    These practices are a valuable resource for any coach who wants insight into what it takes to be successful running a pressure-oriented system.

    257 minutes (3 DVDs). 2015.

    All Access videos are designed to allow viewers from all over the world to see how successful coaches run their practices in a "live" practice setting. All Access videos allow viewers to see the practices un-edited and in real-time. You will see how top coaches run their drills, interact with their team and staff, how they motivate their team, the cue words they use, the atmosphere of the practice and how practices are structured from day to day. Many coaches visit successful colleges and high schools to watch practice. But if you live out of state or out of the country, visiting another coach's gym can be costly. That's why we created the All Access Practice Series of videos -- to bring the practices to you!


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    with Jay Wright,
    Villanova Head Coach;
    3x Big East Coach of the Year;

    Jay Wright opens up one of his practices at Villanova University to show you how his program develops their offensive system. Learn how to improve even the smallest details in techniques for passing, footwork and shooting. Watch as Coach Wright breaks down different scoring options in his offensive system into drills for players to master. See all of the pieces come together and learn how Coach Wright teaches players to recognize game situations as Villanova practices its offense in live scrimmages.

    From the outset, Coach Wright explains that the goal of the 2-hour practice is to continue to build an offensive awareness that will allow each player to execute any offensive move regardless of which foot is the pivot foot. Coach Wright stresses the importance of spacing, reading screens and a general understanding of the details of the various offensive sets that will be used. He wants players to understand the concepts of each set, which then enables them to react more efficiently when an opponent takes away specific options.

    Coach Wright uses skill development, 5-on-0 offense and 5-on-5 situations to translate drill work into game situations.

    Individual Skill Development
    This segment of practice centers on individual skill development. Guards and posts are split with the goal of improving footwork, taking shots that will be available within the offense and reading ball screen situations. Each drill utilizes a passing line as well as a shooting line, with shots present for each of the two players to get repetitions within the drill.

    In the footwork drill series, inside pivots, reverse pivots, drop steps, jab steps, rip-throughs, jump stops in the lane and "bully" drives are heavily emphasized as Coach Wright walks from rim-to-rim to correct any mistakes he sees.

    In the shooting series, players focus on footwork and reading the situation as they execute shots off of ball screens, down screens, curl cuts and flare screens. Within each exercise, players are taught both a go-to move and a counter, as Coach Wright informs the team of which situation they are to imagine occurring prior to each set of reps.

    5-on-0
    The 5-on-0 segment involves incorporating the individual skills work into a 5-on-0 situation (dummy offense). On display are the Villanova aces, deuces, and flat offensive sets. Each involve ball-screen actions but from different locations on the court. As an example, flat involves a high ball-screen at the top of the 3-point line, with two spot up 3-point shooters spread on opposite wings below the free-throw line. The remaining offensive player is below the block near the short corner. The ball handler is instructed to penetrate into the lane where he will have his choice of options depending on which direction he went and which help defender is forced to leave their man.

    5-on-5 Live Scripts
    The segment of practice brings it all together; everything previously worked on is now incorporated into a 5-on-5 setting. A half-court shell offense is on display as aces, deuces and flat sets are incorporated against an active defense. Coach Wright then allows full-court scrimmaging action in a game to 15 where points are awarded for techniques that were emphasized during practice such as turnovers forced, offensive rebounds and all-around skills execution.

    When the crowd is going crazy and the pressure is high, players are going to revert back to the habits they have developed in practice. This presentation will help you to create exceptional technique in your athletes that will translate to victories in games.

    104 minutes. 2015.


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    with Wayne Walters, inventor of the SWARM Defense,
    former Head Coach at Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology.
    His junior college team forced more than 30 turnovers per game in the last four years of his coaching career.

    One of the toughest defenses to face is the match-up zone defense. The creator of the SWARM defense, Wayne Walters, shares the foundation of his match-up zone defense and teaches you how to implement it into your arsenal using various setups and according to the level of aggressiveness you prefer.

    Starting with breakdown concepts for a 1-2-2 and 1-3-1 zone, Coach Walters shares the necessary components for creating an overpowering match up zone defense. He explains the fundamental responsibilities for each position. Based on your personal preference, you can choose to match-UP or match-DOWN to the ball to limit you opponent's offense to specific spots on the court.

    Once these fundamentals are established, Walters adds another very effective layer: the triangle-and-two concept. This is a simple-to-teach concept with a big pay-off. It also confuses the offense because there just aren't any gaps in the paint to pass to. You'll learn how to execute the triangle-and-two concept against both an odd and even front.

    Most coaches will try to attack your match-up zone with dribble penetration and kick-out to shooters. In this segment, you'll learn how to stop dribble penetration from different spots (top, wing, corner) with efficient rotations. The Fist and Twist approaches will keep the ball on the perimeter without leaving shooters open.

    Included in the presentation are two build-up drills: the Bee Drill and Chair Drill. Coach Walters has used these drills to successfully teach rotations and movements within a match-up zone. The Chair Drill teaches players how to stay low defensively. Your players get a great workout while learning how to move within the zone.

    The Bee Drill helps to teach the basic concepts of staying within a triangle. As offensive players cut through the zone, defenders learn where to pick them up and how to bump them to another defender. Starting with 3v3, Coach Walters builds to 4v4 and into the complete 5v5 match-up.

    Boxing out can be a tough task when playing a zone defense. How are you supposed to box out when you are also fronting the post? Coach Walters shows you how to solve these problems and turn a weakness into a strength.

    This on-court presentation covers all of the elements you'll need for a greater understanding of this defensive strategy. Whether it's an odd front, even front, baseline drive, wing drive, or dribble entry, Coach Walters covers every possible situation along with options you can use to create the complete defensive package.

    Explaining innovative ideas to players and coaches can be extremely challenging. Coach Walters has a unique way of making the complex simple by giving clear instruction and giving a visual "home" base. He applies that concept on both sides of the ball and creates what he calls "simple multiplicity". In other words, looks complicated to opponents but crystal clear to your team. SWARM concepts can be integrated at the speed and level of your players basketball IQ regardless of base defense or level of pressure. Coach Walters' teams typically over achieve on defense forcing a high number of turnovers with only half court defense. High school and college coaches that have adopted some version of his system have experienced similar results.

    94 minutes. 2015.


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    with Wayne Walters, inventor of the SWARM Defense,
    former Head Coach at Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology.
    His junior college team forced more than 30 turnovers per game in the last four years of his coaching career.

    If you like switching defenses and stunting opponents' strategy, this is the presentation for you.

    Wayne Walters is a master of the match-up zone and switching defenses. This presentation covers all aspects of his aggressive, half-court 2-3 zone defensive package that has more variations than an opposing offense can handle.

    You will learn the basic SWARM defensive alignment along with nine different coverages ("stunts") that change the rotational patterns and the "when," "where" and "from whom" the trap will occur. Since each coverage has different rotational patterns, you can keep your opponent guessing as to which player or which passing lane will be left open.

    The "Scorpion" is a 2-3 match-up zone that can instantly transform into a man-to-man defense or a 1-3-1 zone. The 2-3 zone formation is used to lure opponents into initiating their usual zone offense against a 2-3. Once they commit, the defensive formation essentially changes into a match-up zone. Stealth, Razor and Laser are used to describe the coverages, rotations and roles of both the guards at the top of the zone as well as the two low block defenders.

    Once the foundation is established, there are several ways to put pressure on your opponent. Your team can show an aggressive 2-3 zone that traps the point guard at the top of the key forcing him/her to give up the ball. Coach Walters gives you different ways to "stunt" to this pass out of the trap and to stunt the next pass or drive.

    The offense never gets comfortable as each stunt involves a different rotational pattern leaving the right wing, left wing, or the high post open after the initial trap. Each package also demonstrates how to rotate out of the center-court trap and includes what to do once the pass is entered to the wing or the corner, and how to handle a baseline drive.

    If a trap on the wing is preferred (or when the opponent does not have a scoring point guard), Thunder, Gamble and Bullet can be used to force the offense into a turnover. Each play tricks the offense into believing that a certain passing lane is open, only to be immediately closed off by the specific stunt related to the coverage being run.

    Lastly, all of the pieces are put together to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Scorpion 2-3 zone. Based on calls from the sideline or the floor leader or based on a predetermined number of passes, the team can run a number of quick stunts to disrupt the offensive flow and strategy to your advantage.

    The Scorpion 2-3 zone will give your opponents nightmares because it's impossible to prepare for. You have so many simple yet highly effective stunts in your arsenal that opposing players cannot help but improvise for a shot.

    Explaining innovative ideas to players and coaches can be extremely challenging. Coach Walters has a unique way of making the complex simple by giving clear instruction and giving a visual "home" base. He applies that concept on both sides of the ball and creates what he calls "simple multiplicity". In other words, looks complicated to opponents but crystal clear to your team. SWARM concepts can be integrated at the speed and level of your players basketball IQ regardless of base defense or level of pressure. Coach Walters' teams typically over achieve on defense forcing a high number of turnovers with only half court defense. High school and college coaches that have adopted some version of his system have experienced similar results.

    76 minutes. 2015.


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  • 06/09/15--22:00: Junk SWARM Defense
  • with Wayne Walters, inventor of the SWARM Defense,
    former Head Coach at Thaddeus Stevens College of Technology.
    His junior college team forced more than 30 turnovers per game in the last four years of his coaching career.

    Junk defenses are unexpected and teams are rarely prepared for them. Wayne Walters, the inventor of the SWARM defense, takes the floor to demonstrate an innovative defense for coaches with a limited talent pool that will create havoc for opposing teams.

    Coach Walters focuses on the three primary junk defenses out of his "Scorpion" 2-3 zone that will allow you to maximize the skills of your role players, while taking the opposing team out of their regular offensive sets by denying their main scoring threat(s).

    You will learn effective strategies for the Box-and-1, Triangle-and-2, the Tandem-and-3-Chasers and more.

    Walters begins with the Bee Drill that teaches players how to defend cutters into the paint. This drill is used in the Triangle-and-2, as well as the Box-and-1. In a progressive manner, Walters shows how to stop individual cutters, multiple cutters, and two cutters and dribble penetration.

    Coach Walters has an arsenal of different junk defenses that are easily taught without spending too much practice time on them, especially if your team is accustomed to his SWARM attack defense.

    He breaks down the positional responsibilities for each player within each defense and includes situational drills. Coach Walters also shows how to double team out of these defenses.

    The defenses demonstrated on the court are:

    • Box and 1
    • Triangle and 2
    • Top stinger/bottom stinger
    • Diamond and 1
    • Twist

    If you're looking to add effective junk defenses to your coaching toolbox, let Coach Walters show you how with his unique variations. With the tricks you'll learn from this presentation, you'll be able to disrupt your opponent's last-second play or haunt them all night long.

    Explaining innovative ideas to players and coaches can be extremely challenging. Coach Walters has a unique way of making the complex simple by giving clear instruction and giving a visual "home" base. He applies that concept on both sides of the ball and creates what he calls "simple multiplicity". In other words, looks complicated to opponents but crystal clear to your team. SWARM concepts can be integrated at the speed and level of your players basketball IQ regardless of base defense or level of pressure. Coach Walters' teams typically over achieve on defense forcing a high number of turnovers with only half court defense. High school and college coaches that have adopted some version of his system have experienced similar results.

    53 minutes. 2015.


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    This is your opportunity to see one of the most star-studded clinics in the country without leaving your living room. Howard Garfinkel's 2014 Basketball Coaches Clinic features a collection of top coaches sharing insights and strategies that will help improve your offense, defense, fundamentals and your coaching.

    Six information-packed sessions!

    Billy Donovan, Full Court Pressure Defense
    NBA head coach Billy Donovan unveils a full-court pressure system that provides the best of both worlds: maximizing the rewards while at the same time minimizing the risk involved. He shows you how to trap in the full court and the half court, including secondary trap situations. You will learn how to effectively set up your full court pressure defense and the keys to making your press successful.

    John Calipari, Coaching Ideas and Practice Drills
    How does Coach Cal get his players to play as a team? John Calipari begins this session with an inside look at how you can build relationships and earn the trust of your players. You'll also learn some of his favorite practice drills for developing passing skills, teamwork and proper reads and decision making.

    Jim Boeheim, Quick Hitting Plays to Attack Man-to-Man and Zone Defenses
    See an extensive playbook that incorporates pick and roll plays used by Jim Boeheim. You will see quick hitters that flow into ball-screen plays against man-to-man defense aimed at getting specific players shots where they are most comfortable on the court. You'll also see two hard to guard "actions" you can use against a 2-3 zone defense.

    Seth Greenberg, Disrupting Offenses with the 1-3-1 Zone Defense
    Turn up the intensity of your zone defense by taking away passing lanes with Seth Greenberg's 1-3-1 zone defense. This strategy will disrupt your opponent's offense and enable your team to force more turnovers and get more points in transition. You'll also learn how to keep the offense off the boards, how to cheat out on great players and how to scramble or trap the corners to shut down shooters.

    Brian Beaury, Basketball Drills for Every Practice
    Brian Beaury has collected over 500 wins in his career. In this session, Beaury demonstrates 12 time-tested drills you can use to get the most out of your practices. These drills will help you teach the fundamentals in a fast-paced and competitive setting. Each drill can be set up quickly and breaks the monotony of longer, more strategy-based exercises.

    Mike Fratello, Basketball Skills, Drills, and Basketball Wisdom
    Coach Fratello mines the depths of his incredible knowledge to share the very best ideas he has learned from a lifetime of coaching at the highest levels. In this session, you'll get ideas for skill development, defensive drills and strategies, and a few dynamite quick hitting plays. In addition, you'll gain an abundance of wisdom that will change your coaching practices for the better.

    This special lineup of coaches, handpicked by Howard Garfinkel, is an illustration of his basketball wisdom. Garf brings with him a lifetime of basketball knowledge and his speakers reflect that knowledge and success.

    370 minutes (3 DVDs). 2015.


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    BD-04702: A Collection of Offensive Sets from the Coaching Profession's Best

    If your coaching toolkit includes a variety of offensive plays, opposing teams will have greater difficulty preparing to play against you.

    In what amounts to an offensive encyclopedia that includes half-court sets from 11 of the greatest coaching minds in today's game, Championship Productions shares clips of some of the best plays ever filmed. Names like Mike Krzyzewski, Pat Summitt, Tom Izzo, Bill Self, Larry Brown, and more are all represented along with some of their trademark formations like the 5-Out, Horns, Hi-Low, and much, much more.

    Add spice to your coaching portfolio with a smorgasbord of half-court offenses. Here's a taste of a few of the plays we've included:

    Duke Elbow Series:
    Duke coaches Chris Collins and Mike Krzyzewski demonstrate the Elbow Series, complete with Elbow Weak, Elbow Up, and Elbow Get. Each space the floor for several 3-point shooters while freeing the rim from defensive protection.

    Fred Hoiberg Series:
    Iowa State Head Coach Fred Hoiberg shares his 50 Pistol, 50 Dive Stick, and 50 Dive Special from a free-flowing, 5-out offensive formation. Utilizing dribble hand-offs and misdirection, these plays create multiple scoring options at the rim and from the 3-point range. Hoiberg also offers his Horns Handoff Burn, High Stacks Pacer, L, Owl, and High plays, giving you a variety of plays to create scoring opportunities from all areas of the court.

    Tom Izzo Series:
    Michigan State Head Coach Tom Izzo offers his Chest, Chest Down, Thumb Down, Horns, and I plays. Each has sharp cuts, quick ball movement and misdirection to help your players score at the rim or complete a weak side shot attempt.

    Larry Brown Series:
    Former NBA and current SMU Head Coach Larry Brown has his team run through Split, Horns, and Horns Shake to get his post players moving quickly from screen-and-roll perimeter action into low-block scoring position. See how your posts can take advantage of the defenders surrounding the action around the ball.

    Gregg Marshall Segment:
    Wichita State's Gregg Marshall pushes his team through 41 Iso, a play designed to use stagger screens to free up an open shooter if the initial baseline drive is cut off.

    Greg McDermott Series:
    Creighton Head Coach Greg McDermott demonstrates a series of nine plays that start from the same formations; each has a counter that shows how a defense might play the various screening actions involved. Plays such as Blitz, Blitz 1 Down, and Blitz 1 Back take advantage of movement as a way to secure the post position for an easy score against an out-of-place defender.

    Dave Paulsen Series:
    Bucknell Head Coach Dave Paulsen shares his V-Entry and Rip, which help create shots for players who may not be able to do so on their own. Using stagger screens, quick ball reversals into ball screens, and spacing puts the defense in difficult positions and aids in creating shots off the pass rather than the dribble.

    Tim Floyd Segment:
    UTEP Head Coach Tim Floyd shows his NBA influence with the 43 play. Court spacing and a high screen and roll leads to dribble penetration at mid-key with two shooters at the ready in the deep corners if the defense decides to collapse on the dribble drive.

    Tara VanDerveer Segment:
    Hall of Famer and current Stanford Head Coach Tara VanDerveer has her team execute Scram, a play designed to dupe the defense into overplaying a double screen, which leaves the screener open on a duck in at the rim.

    Pat Summitt Series:
    Hall of Famer and former Tennessee Head Coach Pat Summitt, puts her team through Spin, Horns, and Horns 2, a series of plays designed to get the ball inside for a layup. Using block-to-block screens, duck-ins, or screen and rolls, she shows how to get the ball into the post off of a cut triggered by movement on the perimeter.

    Bill Self Series:
    Kansas Head Coach Bill Self shares two key plays, Regular and Pitch Ahead, which are both designed to get the ball inside where he knows he'll have a size advantage. Stagger screens and ball reversals ultimately end with a high low setup with the low post having inside scoring position on an over-matched defender.

    Coaches at the high school level or above looking to implement free-flowing movement, misdirection, and screening action into their offensive game plans need look no further than this "best of" production that details several offensive plays from 11 of the greatest minds in the game of basketball today.

    78 minutes. 2014.



    BD-04734: Nine different coaches from the NBA, college and high school levels give you the inbound plays that have helped them win some of the most critical games of their careers. Legendary coaches like Hubie Brown, Tom Izzo, Pat Summitt, and Mike Krzyzewski show you how to score against man or zone defenses with over 25 inbound plays from baseline, sideline, and full-court situations.

    This collection of some of the best inbounds plays in basketball today give you the look at the basket you need to score in a variety of special situations.

    Baseline Inbounds Plays vs. Man-to-Man Defenses:

    • Chips - Coach Tom Izzo shows you how to use pin screens to create inside and outside scoring opportunities. You'll see how to use different alignments and how to get a lob for a quick score at the end of a game. The 31 and 32 plays from his inbounds collection show how to use curl shooters off of double screens at the free throw line for layups and open 3-point shots.
    • Blue Alignment - Villanova Head Coach Jay Wright shares two plays from his "blue alignment" that create isolation for your best players to run a two-man game in space, giving you as many as eight different scoring opportunities within seven seconds.
    • Box Alignment - 2010 USA Today National High School Coach of the Year Vance Downs demonstrates five plays from his "box alignment" that show you how to get open looks at the rim from back screen and screen-the-screener actions.
    • Triangle Set - Former college coach Mike Montgomery demonstrates how to run a screen-the-screener action from a triangle set for some quick open looks. If no shot is available, this play flows into single-double screens for your most talented scorer to use.
    • Duke Line Series - Former Duke associate head coach Chris Collins shares five plays from Duke's "line" series. Each play highlights a different player for added unpredictability and can be used as counter defensive overplays on the basic set play.

    Baseline Inbounds Plays vs. Zone Defenses:

    • Fist Out 1-4 Set - Coach Downs, high school coach of Harrison Barnes and Doug McDermott, uses the Fist Out 1-4 set to stretch the zone defense for an open corner shot off a pin down screen.
    • Box Alignment - Legendary coach Pat Summitt shows you how to gain a wide-open mid-range jump shot by screening in an entire side of the zone from the box alignment.
    • 1-4 Low Set - Thom Sigel, two-time Illinois State Championship Coach, demonstrates how to msdirect the defense from this "1-4 Low" set to create an open gap under the rim for your inbounder to get an easy layup.

    Sideline Inbounds Plays:

    • 1 and 2 Plays - Use flare, stagger and shuffle screens for multiple scoring opportunities with the "1" and "2" inbounds plays. Coach Izzo demonstrates the "golden" inbounds play that uses simultaneous screening actions off of a dribble handoff to give you three different scoring options that are incredibly difficult for the defense to cover all at once.
    • White Play - Villanova Head Coach Jay Wright shows how to score with less than 3 seconds left in the game. Depending on the amount of time left on the clock, Coach Wright explains how to use different options within the play to get the best shot possible.
    • Double - Hall of Fame coach Hubie Brown walks through a "double" sideline inbounds play that gives you the look you need for a game-winning basket using double screens and back screens to create several inside and outside scoring opportunities.

    Full Court Inbounds Plays:

    Indiana Head Coach Tom Crean shares the details to three end-of-game plays to inbound the ball the full length of the floor to score. He also shows how each play has a chance to win with five seconds or less.

    Add to your arsenal of inbound plays with this treasure trove from the biggest names in the game.

    71 minutes. 2015.




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  • 07/02/15--22:00: The Blitz Secondary Break
  • with Lindsay Gottlieb,
    University of California Women's Head Basketball Coach;
    2013 Pac-12 Coach of the Year; 2013 NCAA Final Four; 2013 Pac-12 Conference Champions

    Using a whole-part-whole teaching method, Cal Head Coach Lindsay Gottlieb shares the secrets of her up-tempo offense. Coach Gottlieb breaks down all of the scoring options in her primary and secondary transition offense. With two different looks-each with a second look-to get into these quick attacks, these attacks are terrific ways to score fast baskets. You'll learn the individual and team drills needed to prepare players for this style of play. Coach Gottlieb will also show how the system can be altered based on personnel to make it more perimeter-oriented or focused on feeding the post.

    Secondary Break
    This early offense is based on flowing into a secondary break that spreads the court and allows players to utilize their skill sets to make a play.

    Coach Gottlieb starts by showing whole concepts as players walk through the many different looks that can be used in the secondary break. These quick walk-throughs help the viewer see how each piece is connected. Within these looks the team has a significant number of natural options. Learn multiple ways to score in the initial break based on how the ball is advanced up the court. A ball reversal creates seven additional actions that can be tailored to the skill set of the trailer. This gives you the flexibility to play with big or small line-ups as well as ways to find scoring options inside or through perimeter play.

    You'll see several additional options in the blitz secondary option, which includes two-player actions, strong side triangles, and clear outs to convert the early offense into a spread alignment. You'll also see how Coach Gottlieb adjusts this look if she has a stretch 4 on her team. As a second option, Coach Gottlieb shows how to flow into the secondary break using drag ball screens in transition.

    Individual Breakdown Drills
    Once all of the components of the offense are put into place, Coach Gottleib divides the court into different areas to work on specific breakdown drills that develop chemistry and detail. These drills are essential to learning the offense and developing the skills necessary to effectively run it. In the drill series for guards, you'll see how to develop transition jump shots, attack the rim, play off penetration and kick, and use on-ball screens to score. For the post players, you'll learn how to create early post ups, score 1-on-1 in the post, attack from the top of the key, and break down different screening actions in the offense.

    Team Breakdown Drills
    Coach Gottlieb also shares her transition series of team drills used to breakdown early offense. The transfer drill works on igniting the break from defense to offense with a fast outlet, thus building the habit of playing fast. The drills here mimic the game from rebound to score. Various scenarios are practiced, based on the outlet pass and the first pass available to become more efficient in advancing the ball.

    While the first and second options in transition are easy to explain, they still must be practiced at game speed to be successful. Coach Goetlieb shares her transition drills series. The team practices in 3-on-0, 4-on-0, and 5-on-0 setups with no predetermined scorer to teach players that each one of them must be ready to score. In the 3-on-0 series, players rehearse four different scoring options with the ball side players. Train your players to score quickly by reversing through the trailer with the 4-on-0 series. Use the 5-on-0 series to learn how to flow into the secondary break when your initial options don't create an early scoring opportunity.

    The "Finishing Clinic" works on finishing the shots out of the secondary break at a high percentage. This is a great series of drills to get players working on both the offense and getting the shots up, which they must be able to do in order to be successful at game time. While players believe they are just "working on their shot," they are actually getting more comfortable and practicing the shots they will get in a game. Hence they not only improving their scoring, they're also learning to recognize their opportunities out of the offense.

    Finally, the 5-on-5 transition game is a scrimmage that develops an attack mentality in players by having them stay on offense for consecutive possessions

    If you're looking to add an up-tempo transition offense that will blitz your opposing defense then Coach Gottlieb has the breakdown you need.

    81 minutes. 2015.


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    BD-05271A:

    with Danielle Viglione,
    Sacramento Skills Academy;
    10 years in the WNBA (Sacramento Monarchs) and overseas;
    played for the University of Texas; holds the Texas all-time record for 3-pointers made in a career; her career scoring average ranks fifth all-time in school history

    This video will give you drills to improve your team's dribbling, attacking, and ball control skills to cut down turnovers and increase your team's ability to score!

    If your squad struggles to maintain possession of the ball, individually or collectively, these simple drills will help you improve your team's fundamental ball control skills. Former WNBA player Danielle Viglione brings her world-wide experience to some of her favorite ball handling drills to build the skills necessary to become a more confident and skilled ball handler.

    Viglione teaches players to become solid dribblers using fundamental drills that create a flawless technique for each ball handler. Her drills incorporate a progressive defense that makes the players practice at game speed and compete with one another.

    Stationary & Movement Drills

    Viglione starts with a handful of stationary single ball drills and progresses to using multiple balls while incorporating movement. These drills are a great way to warm up for skill work, practices, or games.

    Building on the warm up drills, Coach Viglione adds challenging partner-resistance drills for fun and purposeful skill work. The resistance drills reinforce good dribbling technique and a strong, wide base so that the dribbler will be able to be strong in his/her drives to the basket while making and maintaining contact with the defender.

    Change of Speed/Direction

    Players advance through several change of speed drills to get the defense off balance, which helps to improve attacking the basket in transition and finishing. Viglione also shows change of direction moves to improve skills such as the crossover, behind the back, or between the legs, and, shares how to create space off the dribble using the inside and outside foot.

    All of the skills worked on are then 'put to the test' through a competitive 1v1 drill.

    These drills are efficient in both time and space, building on each other, and can easily be incorporated into off-season skill development or in-season practices. Let Coach Viglione help take your players' ball handling to the next level!

    63 minutes. 2017.



    BD-05271B:

    with Danielle Viglione,
    Sacramento Skills Academy;
    10 years in the WNBA (Sacramento Monarchs) and overseas;
    played for the University of Texas; holds the Texas all-time record for 3-pointers made in a career; her career scoring average ranks fifth all-time in school history

    In today's game, shooting the basketball is one of the most important skills a player can develop. Using a progression of shooting drills, Danielle Viglione teaches the nuances to becoming a knock-down shooter.

    Coach Viglione provides over 20 shooting drills that she has used from her experience around the globe with basketball, and teaches her personal favorites, including 'drift shooting' and shooting off the curl. You'll get exercises that work on:

    • One Hand Shooting - Develop the fundamentals of a good shooting form and mechanics with these drills. These drills are meant to develop proper shooting form and help build the shooter from the ground up. Being on balance, proper elbow alignment, and footwork are all the basic building blocks that need to be routinely drilled and mastered.
    • Catch and Shoot - Learn to develop rhythm in your shooters with various catching angles, footwork, and balance techniques. Viglione covers strategies to improve all aspects of shooting, focusing on improving range and accuracy. She progressively adds defense to take the drills from form to mastery at game speed.
    • Shooting on the Move - Learn how to get open by setting up your opponent to create space to get your shot off. You'll see how to cut off screens and read the defense to get an open shot in rhythm.
    Proper footwork and shot mechanics can be mastered using these drills that will help your players shoot better when creating their own shot, or coming off screens.

    From fundamentals, to catch and shoot, to shooting on the move or off cuts, Coach Viglione's insightful break down of mastering the art of shooting is a great addition to your arsenal of shooting resources!

    81 minutes. 2017



    BD-05271C:

    with Danielle Viglione,
    Sacramento Skills Academy;
    10 years in the WNBA (Sacramento Monarchs) and overseas;
    played for the University of Texas; holds the Texas all-time record for 3-pointers made in a career; her career scoring average ranks fifth all-time in school history

    As statistics show, the most successful teams get to the paint! In this video, you will learn valuable techniques and drills that will improve your players' ability to both get into the lane and finish at the rim.

    Using a series of drills, Danielle Viglione demonstrates how to increase your team's effectiveness at the rim. By working up from basic finishes all the way to combining finishes in a team drill, Coach Viglione gives a multitude of options for teaching players how to score at the rim. She provides detailed coaching points and thorough examples to show how to increase your players' finishing ability.

    Basic Finishes

    Using two balls to force players to have balance and concentration, Coach Viglione discusses basic finishing moves around the basket, focusing on keeping the ball high and finishing high. From Mikan moves to reverse layups, players practice finishing around the basket with both hands. Viglione also utilizes chairs to work on different angles, addressing the issue that many young players have of not taking long steps to the basket while simultaneously focusing on proper footwork.

    Two-Foot Finishes

    Progressing from jumping off one foot, Viglione moves on to jumping and finishing off two feet practicing from various angles. Using the phrase "one step, one dribble" helps players understand no wasted steps while gathering yourself when attacking the rim. Viglione shares insights into how to react to the defense, counter moves and protecting the basketball.

    Two foot finishes are important to teach because they help players play under control, more balance and power around contact, and allow for counter pivots and moves.

    Jump Hook Finishes

    The next phase of the video discusses the jump hook. Viglione teaches how to protect the ball and finish high over the defense, and, the two different ways of gathering yourself when attempting the move.

    Position Finishes

    Putting all the finishes together in a team setting, players practice their moves while rotating from all the positions along the perimeter. A valuable drill displayed in this segment works on finishing against a defender, beating them with their foot and shoulder, and separating from the defense. This also progresses to reading the next defender in the paint and the options for the offensive player.

    Turning Into Your Power Finish

    This portion of drills teaches players how to turn into the shot (square up) and finish strong after a rebound while protecting the ball. These drills are done individually and with a defender, working on scoring against contact and using counter moves.

    Team Finishing Drills

    Coach Viglione wraps it up with competitive team finishing drills, allowing players to work on all the moves they've practiced.

    The progression of drills displayed in this video will give your players multiple options of finishing at the rim and the ability to react to the defense to choose the right move at the right time!

    67 minutes. 2017.




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    with Alan Marshall,
    Former Cascade (IA) High School Head Coach;
    2016 Iowa Class 2A State Runner-up;
    3rd on the Iowa all-time wins list (738 victories),
    3x State of Iowa Coach of the Year;
    led the entire state in defensive scoring average in 7 of the last 11 years (2006-16)

    Al Marshall's knowledge, understanding, and time spent using and coaching the 2-3 zone may be unmatched.

    Regularly outgunned by league opponents, Marshall started to experiment with a 2-3 zone defense when he knew man-to-man defense wouldn't work against more athletic players. His teams fully converted to the zone full time when he experienced the benefits of zone defense.

    Using both whiteboard lectures and on-court demonstration, Marshall introduces the fundamental movements of the defense as well as many intricacies and drills that must be known to make this defense consistently dominant. While you've seen the 2-3 defense through the years, Coach Marshall makes it relevant again with the information in this video.

    2-3 Zone Slides

    Using a whole-part-whole teaching method, Coach Marshall presents the "slides" of the defense. These are the movements, positions, and responsibilities of the players within the 2-3 zone. For each of the slides, Marshall breaks down where and why the players do what he asks them to do, providing critical teaching points for helping them be successful in their role. He also talks about the areas that the defense aims to take away.

    A few of the slides he covers or situations that are addressed are:

    • Slides on a skip pass
    • When the ball drops into the post
    • Weak side flashes
    • Passes into the short corner
    • Double team options
    • Forcing baseline
    • and more!

    Marshall also includes topics such as how to cover an offense trying to spread you out with a 4-out alignment, and, how to rebound when the shot is taken from different locations on the floor so you're not conceding any second chance points to your opponent. You'll see how you can adapt your 2-3 zone for out of bounds situations based on the alignment the offense uses in their plays.

    Breakdown Drills for the 2-3 Zone Defense

    Coach Marshall helps you implement the 2-3 with more than 10 practice drills that will develop the technique and instincts needed by your team to be effective defenders in the zone.

    The Eight vs. Five Drill encompasses many necessary concepts from the 2-3 zone defense. In this drill, the offense has eight players positioned around the court. Each player stays in their area as the ball moves from player to player. The players are encouraged to score from their spots if the defense doesn't get there. The defensive players must move while the ball is in the air in order to defend all the necessary spots. This drill does a great job of getting the players to find the right spots over and over. If their slides are done correctly, the offense shouldn't be able to get a shot off.

    Other drills include:

    • Mass Fundamentals Drill - Works on stance and movement, plus builds strength in the muscles that are necessary to play defense for the entire game.
    • The Deflection Drill - Teaches players to disrupt passes and fly around the court for interceptions.
    • The Guard Overload Drill - Helps your top defenders to begin anticipating the next pass to take away opportunities for shooters waiting on the ball.
    • The High Post to Short Corner Drill - Trains your center and forwards to react with the proper slides when the ball gets into critical areas.

    If you want a way to neutralize the threat of dribble penetration and limit your fouls while forcing opponents into jump shots, then this video from Coach Marshall is for you!

    112 minutes. 2018.


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    with Alan Marshall,
    Former Cascade (IA) High School Head Coach;
    2016 Iowa Class 2A State Runner-up;
    3rd on the Iowa all-time wins list (738 victories),
    3x State of Iowa Coach of the Year;
    led the entire state in defensive scoring average in 7 of the last 11 years (2006-16)

    In over four decades of coaching, Al Marshall has seen everything that you can possibly run against the 2-3 zone defense. In this video, he shares his encyclopedic knowledge to help you prepare for the most common offensive attacks. Additionally, you will learn adjustments you can make in your zone to extend your defense to full court pressure, force turnovers with half court traps, or confuse your opponent by locking down specific players.

    Defend Common Situations against a 2-3 Zone

    Over the course of the season you are going to see a variety of different strategies used against your zone. Your players need you to be prepared for these different attacks. Through whiteboard lectures and on-court demonstration, Coach Marshall discusses how to defend high post flashes, point guard penetration, skip passes to shooters behind screens, lob plays, ball screens, and more.

    For every strategy demonstrated, you will learn how to adjust your defense to counter how your opponent is trying to score.

    Full Court Pressure

    You'll see a package of full court defenses that can help you take time off the shot clock or increase the pressure to force turnovers. Marshall demonstrates how you can vary the pressure and confuse your opponents with a 2-2-1 press, full court man-to-man, and a 1-3-1 press.

    In addition, see how you can add in double teams to your 2-3 zone defense through three different trapping situations. These are a great way to catch your opponent by surprise after a timeout or dead ball.

    Shut Down the Opponent's Star Player

    Coach Marshall shows how to adjust for teams with a star player. You can create confusion and neutralize these talented players with a chaser. You'll see how you can use this defense to take away great shooters, post players, and more. Learn how you can shift the zone from a diamond to box alignment to keep the opponent guessing throughout the game. This is a perfect adjustment toward the end of the season when you're playing a team for the second time or heading into postseason play.

    This video covers a wide range of special situations your team will encounter. Whether you're strictly a 2-3 defensive team or utilize this defense to prevent late-game perimeter shots, Coach Marshall will help you fine-tune your craft to excel in any situation!

    102 minutes. 2018.


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    BD-05298A:

    with Alan Marshall,
    Former Cascade (IA) High School Head Coach;
    2016 Iowa Class 2A State Runner-up;
    3rd on the Iowa all-time wins list (738 victories),
    3x State of Iowa Coach of the Year;
    led the entire state in defensive scoring average in 7 of the last 11 years (2006-16)

    Al Marshall's knowledge, understanding, and time spent using and coaching the 2-3 zone may be unmatched.

    Regularly outgunned by league opponents, Marshall started to experiment with a 2-3 zone defense when he knew man-to-man defense wouldn't work against more athletic players. His teams fully converted to the zone full time when he experienced the benefits of zone defense.

    Using both whiteboard lectures and on-court demonstration, Marshall introduces the fundamental movements of the defense as well as many intricacies and drills that must be known to make this defense consistently dominant. While you've seen the 2-3 defense through the years, Coach Marshall makes it relevant again with the information in this video.

    2-3 Zone Slides

    Using a whole-part-whole teaching method, Coach Marshall presents the "slides" of the defense. These are the movements, positions, and responsibilities of the players within the 2-3 zone. For each of the slides, Marshall breaks down where and why the players do what he asks them to do, providing critical teaching points for helping them be successful in their role. He also talks about the areas that the defense aims to take away.

    A few of the slides he covers or situations that are addressed are:

    • Slides on a skip pass
    • When the ball drops into the post
    • Weak side flashes
    • Passes into the short corner
    • Double team options
    • Forcing baseline
    • and more!

    Marshall also includes topics such as how to cover an offense trying to spread you out with a 4-out alignment, and, how to rebound when the shot is taken from different locations on the floor so you're not conceding any second chance points to your opponent. You'll see how you can adapt your 2-3 zone for out of bounds situations based on the alignment the offense uses in their plays.

    Breakdown Drills for the 2-3 Zone Defense

    Coach Marshall helps you implement the 2-3 with more than 10 practice drills that will develop the technique and instincts needed by your team to be effective defenders in the zone.

    The Eight vs. Five Drill encompasses many necessary concepts from the 2-3 zone defense. In this drill, the offense has eight players positioned around the court. Each player stays in their area as the ball moves from player to player. The players are encouraged to score from their spots if the defense doesn't get there. The defensive players must move while the ball is in the air in order to defend all the necessary spots. This drill does a great job of getting the players to find the right spots over and over. If their slides are done correctly, the offense shouldn't be able to get a shot off.

    Other drills include:

    • Mass Fundamentals Drill - Works on stance and movement, plus builds strength in the muscles that are necessary to play defense for the entire game.
    • The Deflection Drill - Teaches players to disrupt passes and fly around the court for interceptions.
    • The Guard Overload Drill - Helps your top defenders to begin anticipating the next pass to take away opportunities for shooters waiting on the ball.
    • The High Post to Short Corner Drill - Trains your center and forwards to react with the proper slides when the ball gets into critical areas.

    If you want a way to neutralize the threat of dribble penetration and limit your fouls while forcing opponents into jump shots, then this video from Coach Marshall is for you!

    112 minutes. 2018.



    BD-05298B:

    with Alan Marshall,
    Former Cascade (IA) High School Head Coach;
    2016 Iowa Class 2A State Runner-up;
    3rd on the Iowa all-time wins list (738 victories),
    3x State of Iowa Coach of the Year;
    led the entire state in defensive scoring average in 7 of the last 11 years (2006-16)

    In over four decades of coaching, Al Marshall has seen everything that you can possibly run against the 2-3 zone defense. In this video, he shares his encyclopedic knowledge to help you prepare for the most common offensive attacks. Additionally, you will learn adjustments you can make in your zone to extend your defense to full court pressure, force turnovers with half court traps, or confuse your opponent by locking down specific players.

    Defend Common Situations against a 2-3 Zone

    Over the course of the season you are going to see a variety of different strategies used against your zone. Your players need you to be prepared for these different attacks. Through whiteboard lectures and on-court demonstration, Coach Marshall discusses how to defend high post flashes, point guard penetration, skip passes to shooters behind screens, lob plays, ball screens, and more.

    For every strategy demonstrated, you will learn how to adjust your defense to counter how your opponent is trying to score.

    Full Court Pressure

    You'll see a package of full court defenses that can help you take time off the shot clock or increase the pressure to force turnovers. Marshall demonstrates how you can vary the pressure and confuse your opponents with a 2-2-1 press, full court man-to-man, and a 1-3-1 press.

    In addition, see how you can add in double teams to your 2-3 zone defense through three different trapping situations. These are a great way to catch your opponent by surprise after a timeout or dead ball.

    Shut Down the Opponent's Star Player

    Coach Marshall shows how to adjust for teams with a star player. You can create confusion and neutralize these talented players with a chaser. You'll see how you can use this defense to take away great shooters, post players, and more. Learn how you can shift the zone from a diamond to box alignment to keep the opponent guessing throughout the game. This is a perfect adjustment toward the end of the season when you're playing a team for the second time or heading into postseason play.

    This video covers a wide range of special situations your team will encounter. Whether you're strictly a 2-3 defensive team or utilize this defense to prevent late-game perimeter shots, Coach Marshall will help you fine-tune your craft to excel in any situation!

    102 minutes. 2018.




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    with Matt Painter,
    Purdue University Head Coach;
    2017 Big 10 Regular Season Champions - has led Purdue to three Big 10 titles (2009 regular-season and 2010 tournament;
    3x Big Ten Coach of the Year; 2x Sweet Sixteen appearances;
    2009 US U19 National Team (Assistant Coach), Gold Medalist at the FIBA U19 World Championship

    Known for his great defensive teams at Purdue, Matt Painter uses this on-court demonstration to show ways in which he builds his team's trademark man-to-man defense. Building from transition defense to half-court defense and rebounding, Painter takes you through various drills to show you how to build a great defense which you can rely on every night.

    Transition Defense

    Beginning with how offense is taught, Coach Painter details the ways in which his team gets back after a shot is taken. Painter has always focused on the ability to pick up the ball off of a make or a miss in order to work the primary ball handler from the opening tip to the end of the game. Getting his point guard to the top of the key area and another guard back as a rim protector, Painter's teams begin to build their defense in transition.

    The main job of the point guard in transition defense is to stop the outlet. This is done to slow down the other team's transition attack on a missed shot. With an emphasis on having a disciplined point guard being a "centered safety," the design is to stop the pass, head up the floor, and force the other team's point guard to come back to the ball and buy time for the defense to get set.

    Building transition defense begins with 3 on 2/2 on 1. Painter uses this drill to teach how to rotate with a two-man defense against three oncoming offensive players in a 3-on-2 situation. The 2-on-1 defense places an emphasis on protecting the basket and forcing a pull-up jump shot. Additionally, a modified progression develops defense in 4-on-3 and 5-on-4 transition situations.

    Scrimmage Drills for Transition Defense

    With three teams of three, Painter introduces the Kansas City drill. This drill works on transition defense in a 3-on-3-on-3 scrimmage. Coaches are along the sideline and underneath each basket in this cutthroat-style drill. Outlet passes made to coaches along the sideline get passed up the floor to simulate a transition attack.

    A drill progression is introduced to teach transition defense. Starting with a free throw, the drill progresses to 2-on-1 to 3-on-2 to 4-on-3 to 5-on-4 to 5-on-5 play with players getting added into the drill. The teaching points that were introduced earlier with 3-on-2/2-on-1 are covered, as well as a modified progression that works on teaching 4-on-3 and 5-on-4 transition situations.

    The Rush drill is used to work on how to get back on defense and play at a disadvantage. With a big man already in the front court, four offensive players attack against a defense caught in transition. As soon as the offensive player gets the ball passed to them by the coach, their man runs and touches the baseline as the offense advances the ball up the floor.

    Half-Court Defense

    Two variations of the Shell drill are introduced by Painter as he teaches stunting and rotational slides that are important for a strong half court defensive team. The first is 4-Out Shell Drill as a way to teach how to guard against cutters, baseline drives, and dribble-thrus. Using this setup, guarding against these situations is taught by covering rotations on defense.

    Second is the 3-Out/1-In Shell drill alignment. The first feature of this alignment is the ability to teach post defense in Shell drill. A high 3/4-denial is used when the ball is above the free throw line extended while a full front happens with both hands up. Post release is also covered with baseline drives from the wing with the big man rotating down to help to stop the drive.

    Painter ends with defensive skill drills to begin your practice in order to avoid foul trouble and limit your opponent's offensive efficiency rating.

    With the level of insight into Coach Painter's defense that is presented in this video, your teams will be able to be aggressive on the defensive end, eliminate transition baskets, and use your defense as good offense.

    Produced at the Spring 2017 Chicago (IL) Nike Championship Basketball Clinic.

    75 minutes. 2018.


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    with Geno Auriemma,

    • 3x U.S. Women's Olympic Basketball Head Coach (3x Gold Medal; '00, '12, '16)
    • 1000+ career wins - Fastest coach to 800, 900 and 1,000 wins, any level, men's or women's
    • 11x NCAA Women's Basketball National Championship Coach ('95, '00, '02 -'04, '09 - '10, '13 - '16)
    • 9x AP Coach of the Year; 8x Naismith Coach of the Year; 7x WBCA National Coach of the Year; 6x USBWA Women's National Coach of the Year
    • John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching award (2012)
    • Inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame ('06); Women's Basketball Hall of Fame ('06); National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame ('07)
    • 19x Big East regular season and 22x Big East tournament titles

    Offensive progress often comes at a slower pace than gains on the defensive side of the ball. Hall of Fame coach Geno Auriemma shows how you can build the foundation for offensive excellence in a short period of time.

    This video is a condensed version of how Auriemma and his staff install and practice their up-tempo offensive attack. Coach Auriemma teaches the offense in the half-court and progresses to transition, teaching players the 'why' behind each offensive set and how to read the defense.

    By using a variety of transition drills that flow seamlessly into offensive sets, this video will help you increase the pace of play your team is comfortable executing. Different transition and secondary break sets will help streamline your offense and keep players from struggling for good looks at the basket late in the shot clock.

    Coach Auriemma discusses the following keys to making your offense the best that it can be:

    • How to simplify and execute an unstoppable basic offense.
    • When and why coaches need to make adjustments to their game plan.
    • Why and how team success is related to shot selection.
    • Drills you can use to improve your transition game.

    Strong, Curl, Pinch

    Auriemma and his staff run their players through several different actions and set plays including Strong, Curl, and Pinch. Each action is run 5-on-0 and many options are discussed and practiced. This is a perfect example of how to teach your players the reads within your offense and set plays.

    Making Adjustments and Set Plays Philosophy

    Learn how the most successful program in women's college basketball utilizes set plays to augment its offensive execution. Taking a "less is more" approach, Auriemma discusses when not to use set plays and how they can hamper your team's scoring.

    If your team sometimes struggles to create open looks for shooters, you'll want to pay particular attention to Auriemma's breakdown on how to utilize a dribble drive attack to free up shooters and force difficult defensive rotations.

    Team Practice Drills and Breakdown Drills

    Auriemma runs the team through a number of drills - at championship-level practice speed - and with plenty of teaching and corrections, starting with the Kansas drill, a full court drill with four trips where players complete different shots and actions. The first trip finishes with a lay-up, the second a jumper, third a skip pass and a drive, and fourth a drag screen action.

    Another full-court drill to teach an attacking mentality and full court offense is the 5-man weave to 3-on-2 drill. Players go down in a weave and then come back to 3-on-2 with the person who made the lay-up and the last person to pass the ball becoming the two defenders. Auriemma breaks down the drill and explains how to best defend a 3-on-2 situation.

    Special Situations and Baseline Out of Bounds

    Coach Auriemma shares his thoughts about practicing special situations and then you'll move back to the court and see how they practice their out-of-bounds play execution. Auriemma also shows the different options that will be available.

    At every stage of this video, Auriemma's principles and actions are concise and thoroughly explained. By demonstrating the "why" behind the offensive sets and drills, coaches and players will gain insight into the key offensive principles behind the game planning.

    This video is jam-packed with nuggets of wisdom from Coach Auriemma from beginning to end. It will help you develop an outstanding offense no matter what age or talent level you coach!

    117 minutes. 2018.


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    with Bob Huggins,
    West Virginia University Head Coach;
    2015 Big-12 Coach of the Year;
    2015 Jim Phelan National Coach of the Year;
    over 765 career wins; C-USA Coach of the Decade

    Learn how to build team morale and improve team chemistry by incorporating Huggins' disruptive press system.

    Bob Huggins has been a pioneer in pressure defense all over the court. In recent years, Huggins has kept his core principle, but tweaked and changed multiple areas of his pressure defense. These changes have molded his team into a relentless full-court pressure style of play.

    In this video, Huggins takes a deep dive into his defensive style - discussing where he started pressing from, the keys he uses with his players, and showing us daily drills that have been useful in this process.

    Press Philosophy

    Effort and activity are the key ingredients required to run this defense. Huggins provides keen insight on how to encourage players to provide maximum effort. He explains what the definition of their full court pressure is and takes you to the half court to show principles of half court defense that apply when moving into the full court..

    Two of Huggins' concepts are forcing the ball handler to his left (or weak hand) and making the bigger post players dribble. He exposes weak ball handlers by having defenders get up into the opponents' dribbling and passing pockets. West Virginia doesn't believe in giving up any space on the floor, providing relentless pressure for 40 minutes. Huggins requires his team to pressure the ball all over the floor and deny inbound passes while looking for trapping opportunities. His players are trained to find their man and deny them immediately as soon as the ball goes through the basket.

    Disrupt Spacing

    Offenses are based on spacing and direct passes can lead to shots. Coach Huggins shows how his team forces opponents to pass over, under, around, but never through. Direct passes are going to hurt your team because they lead to good shots that players and teams practice. Huggins fronts the post, which forces teams to throw over the top, which allows your defense to rotate and get into position. Lobs take time to reach the player, and bounce passes also take time to arrive.

    Trapping

    Huggins breaks down his half-court defense, explaining the concepts of "forcing the ball to lines" and "giving help defense in line." When teams are forced to a line, they are easier to trap, which results in no "direct drives" to the basket. Huggins explains that a line can be trapped because it breaks down spacing. In this system, players must never play with their hands down because it makes them too easy to get screened. Huggins requires his players to constantly look for traps when the opponent's spacing breaks down.

    4 on 4+1 Drill

    By pressing and trapping, you are going to give up numbers. Huggins uses on-court demonstration to simulate playing with a disadvantage. In 4 on 4+1, your defense works on being down a player against the offense. This drill forces your team to cover the floor, both in the full and half court. Your defense must work on rotations and pressuring the basketball to take away direct passes. Players in help defense are on the help line, and athletes one pass away are in the passing lane.

    Q&A Session

    Insight provided by Coach Huggins will make you re-evaluate your philosophy on basic team defense, motivating players, and building team morale and chemistry. Huggins takes questions like:

    • Do you press on a miss?
    • Do you trap a ball screen?
    • How much time do you spend on denying the inbound?
    • How he utilizes a "centerfielder" to take away all over-the-top passes?
    • What is his "run and sit" method of getting his team to play hard?

    If you're looking to install a system that not only makes your opponent uncomfortable, but increases your team morale and chemistry, then this is just what you're looking for! Make your opponents play at maximum effort for four quarters with this system from Coach Huggins.

    Produced at the Spring 2017 Las Vegas Nike Championship Basketball Clinic.

    77 minutes. 2018.


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    with Geno Auriemma,

    • 3x U.S. Women's Olympic Basketball Head Coach (3x Gold Medal; '00, '12, '16)
    • 1000+ career wins - Fastest coach to 800, 900 and 1,000 wins, any level, men's or women's
    • 11x NCAA Women's Basketball National Championship Coach ('95, '00, '02 -'04, '09 - '10, '13 - '16)
    • 9x AP Coach of the Year; 8x Naismith Coach of the Year; 7x WBCA National Coach of the Year; 6x USBWA Women's National Coach of the Year
    • John R. Wooden Legends of Coaching award (2012)
    • Inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame ('06); Women's Basketball Hall of Fame ('06); National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame ('07)
    • 19x Big East regular season and 22x Big East tournament titles

    If you were given only six days to prepare your team to play aggressive, tenacious defense, how would you accomplish that feat? In this video, the coach of the most successful team in women's college basketball shows you how to do just that.

    Discover the tenets of how to construct a tough and tenacious defensive team. Geno Auriemma presents a clear philosophy to operate from and how to effectively communicate the defensive principles needed to stop any team you face.

    After outlining three basic goals for every game, Auriemma and his coaching staff show you how to plan your practice and break down defensive skills into a variety of intense stations that will challenge your players every minute of practice.

    Defensive Philosophy

    The defensive approach begins with ball pressure. Coach Auriemma likes to use ball pressure to take the opposing team's offense outside of their comfort zone. Doing this forces more mistakes by the offense and results in more turnovers and bad shots.

    Second, Auriemma works on defending the areas of the court that are the most important. The use of a line running down the middle of the court is used to get help a defender get in position to defend what is most necessary to protect against.

    Third, three objectives are laid out by Coach Auriemma: eliminating transition baskets, eliminating 3-point shots, and not fouling. When these objectives are accomplished during the course of a game, it is much more difficult for their opponents to score.

    Individual Defense Drills

    The first key to individual defense is to get into a good defensive stance. The Stance and Slides drill teaches how to get into a good stance and how to move correctly. This mass drill, one that involves the entire team, incorporates fundamental on-ball defense. It shows that even the best players in the country don't overlook learning the basics of stance.

    Next is the Zig-Zag drill with a twist from a traditional version of this drill. Each on-ball defender will go through two rounds by guarding the ball to the half-court line. When the first dribbler reaches the half-court line, the defender starts the second round by executing a closeout to the baseline. Containment of the dribble and forcing changes in direction are critical elements that are taught.

    Defensive Stations

    To better teach individual defense, the team is broken into groups where the assistant coaches run five minute stations to work on various aspects of defensive play. In small groups, players have a chance to learn how to better defend in breakdowns of scenarios that might arise during a game. You'll be able to see the instruction and the repetitions of players as they rotate through the various stations.

    The 1-on-1 defensive station is designed to teach how to guard the basketball properly. The on-ball defender is to position herself one arm's length away from the dribbler. To simulate this, the inside hand reaches out to mirror the basketball while the other hand helps deny passes and drives to the sideline or to the baseline. Auriemma uses a live-action drill to teach these concepts with a three-dribble limit starting from each wing.

    To teach defensive rebounding, a drill is devised with an offensive and a defensive player going up after a missed shot. The defensive player throws the ball off of the backboard and tries to block out the would-be offensive rebounder. If the offensive rebounder gets the ball, they attempt to score. The defensive rebounder looks to make an outlet pass if they rebound the ball.

    A wing denial station is utilized to encourage an aggressive mindset and to deny passes around the perimeter. The bottom foot of the defender denying the pass is to split the feet of the offensive player they are guarding. On back cuts, the defender has to be ready to snap the head and throw their hands to see and deflect passes.

    Team Defense

    The Shell is a basic drill that everyone who plays man defense will run. In this section, you'll see how Auriemma uses it to teach how he wants his squad to defend, help, and rotate. Working on basic "jumping to the ball," defenders are encouraged to move quickly and attempt to deflect perimeter passes. The Shell drill can escalate to incorporate dribble penetration to work on defensive rotations as well as help and recover.

    To prevent easy baskets in transition, transition defense is a point of emphasis in teaching defense. Auriemma teaches his players to sprint back to areas deep in the lane to make sure they don't give up layups. From there, the defense looks to see where the ball is and how to best prepare to defend the other team's transition attack.

    With a mix of individual and team techniques, this video from Coach Auriemma will give you drills and practice insights for virtually any defensive situation.

    124 minutes. 2018.


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